Interview with K. E. Saxon

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Interview with K. E. Saxon

Affaire de Coeur's

July Calendar Girl

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Author K.E. Saxon writes the types of stories she loves to read. Her historical romances are set in the medieval Scottish Highlands and feature brave warrior lairds, strong-minded heroines, nefarious plots, and high intrigue. Her contemporary romances are set in Texas, where she has lived and thrived her entire life, and feature sexy, devilish heroes with Texas drawls who meet smart, feisty heroines that foil their plans for continued bachelorhood.

 

  1. When did you start writing and why?

            I had written poetry (more stream-of-consciousness, angst-y stuff—certainly nothing worthy of any other eyes seeing it, lol!) and in personal journals for years and years. I’d tried writing fiction, like essays or short stories that were more literary in nature, and, honestly, I bored myself silly. I just couldn’t stay interested in what I was writing. Then, one day, after reading Julie Garwood’s The Bride for about the 20th time, I once again felt that I wanted desperately to know what happened to Mary and Daniel, the sister and friend of the main characters. This was November of 2006. So, it just really popped into my head to try to write the story myself, JUST for me, of course, so that every time I read The Bride again, I’d also feel satisfied knowing what happened to Mary and Daniel. Anyway, it ended up taking more time for me to get my computer up and running and to open a blank document, than it took me to figure out I truly had ZERO idea how Julie Garwood would write those characters—and that’s really what I wanted: Julie Garwood to write the story of Mary and Daniel (still do)! SO, I let that grand scheme fall to the wayside. However, I realized just about as quickly that I had a few great plot ideas, and, since I had no idea what motivated Julie Garwood’s characters, I made up some of my own. After that, it just flowed like water over a fall. And that is how Highland Vengeance came to be.

 

  1. What have you learned about writing since you started?

 

            More than could possibly be expressed in a brief answer, I assure you! However, just allowing the first thing to pop into my mind, I’d say one of the most crucial things I’ve learned to do, which has helped me in my writing process, is to write loads of backstory for each of the main characters, freestyle, just brainstorming in my notes before I ever begin the book. Then, I have found, the characters do not operate “out of character” as often while I’m writing the first draft.

 

  1. Tell us about your new book or series.

 

            NORDIC MOON, the new book I’m in the process of completing, is the second book in a duology about the Cambels. It is set in the Isle of Lewis in the early 13th century, when the island was still under the control of the King of Norway. The heroine is a Highland lady seeress who has foresworn and hidden her abilities, and the hero is a sexy Norseman who, after a night of passion with her at the Scottish king’s court, discovers the encounter has borne fruit and sweeps her away to his island holding against her will.

 

  1. What is your idea of a perfect day?

 

            A writing day when the words flow like sparkling water over a fall, when the weather is sunny, but in the high 60s or low 70s and with low humidity, so I can go out on my deck and commune with nature while I let my imagination take the reins.

 

  1. Do you have any hobbies?

 

            Yes! I crochet, knit, garden, draw a little with pen and ink

 

  1. What is the worst thing about being an author?

 

            Doing all the self-promotion, hands down, lol! I always feel awkward doing so.

 

  1. What is your favorite thing about being an author?

 

            Writing, and meeting or communicating with fans!

 

  1. How many books do you currently have out on the market and what genres do they fall into?

 

            I have four medieval Highlander romances, two contemporary romances, and two contemporary romance novellas. The first three books of my Medieval Highlanders Series, which is a trilogy about the Macleans called The Highlands Trilogy, is also published as a digital compilation set. As well, the first book in the trilogy, Highland Vengeance, is published as a six-part serialized digital version.

           

  1. What can we expect from you next?

 

            After I finish Nordic Moon, I plan on finishing another contemporary that I have already begun. After that, I plan on working on the book that focuses on the love story of Reys and Alyson, two characters introduced in my Highlands Trilogy about the Macleans.

 

  1. Pass on some words of wisdom, please, to aspiring authors.

Well, besides practice, practice, practice, the best advice I could possibly give is to read, underscore, highlight, place post-it notes on, and take to heart (and practice until you “get” what they mean) the extremely good advice given in the following short-list of how-to books:

  1. Scene and Structure (Elements of Fiction Writing), by Jack M. Bickham, Jack Heffron
  2. GMC: Goal, Motivation and Conflict: The Building Blocks of Good Fiction, by Debra Dixon
  3. Self-Editing for Fiction Writers: How to Edit Yourself Into Print, by Renni Browne, Dave King
  4. Writing the Breakout Novel, by Donald Maass
  5. Between the Lines: Master the Subtle Elements of Fiction Writing, by Jessica Page Morrell

These were the first books I read (devoured, and did all the above list of items to), but there are many others.

I also happen to use the 3-Act structure, but there are many excellent authors who use the 4-Act or some other structure, which aids them in plotting their novels. Or, loads of writers find that a fly-by-the-seat-of-their-pants approach works best for them. Each writer is different, and there are no hard-and-fast “rules” or “right” answers that all writers need abide by, as far as this is concerned. Ultimately, the “right” way is the one that’s “right” for you.

 



Please give us the following contact information:

 

Personal web page: http://www.kesaxon.com

Twitter: @KESaxonAuthor

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kesaxonauthorpage

 

 

 

 

 

 



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